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4-1-1 in the 5-3-3 May 2014

Written by Alexanna Salmon on .

In all my life growing up in Igiugig, I do not remember a more spectacular spring season. Everyday the sun is shining, naturally energizing us all. We’ve had more barbecues, maniaqs, and outdoor adventures in an ice-free lake and river. There is something about the outdoors and sunshine that brings the community together and you can feel the happiness. We are such a happy bunch right now if a big rain cloud were to roll up we’d probably jump with pure joy!

In the last month we had a visit from Ruth St. Amour, the local government specialist for DCCED to review the Municipal Lands Trustee Program (MLT). This program is for Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) villages that do not have a city government. Section 14(c)(3) of ANCSA stipulates that at least 1,280 acres (unless otherwise agreed upon) of village corporation land conveyances from the federal government must be designated for community use and expansion of a city. In communities without a city, the State of Alaska holds the land “in trust” for any future city (http://commerce.alaska.gov/dcra/pub/OverviewMLTProgram.pdf). The Igiugig Native Corporation finally completed it’s 14(c) survey, and thus just last month all the 14(c)(3) properties were deeded to the State of Alaska in trust for the future city of Igiugig and IVC will be signing leases for parcels that we use. For example, the washeteria, bulk fuel farm, the landfill, etc. are on municipal lands. The Igiugig Native Corporation has also deeded certain properties directly to IVC such as Lot 13, which the clinic sits on, so this property is owned by the tribe and lies outside the MLT. The MLT Program must consult with local residents in the management of municipal trust land, and a representative group called an “appropriate village entity” (AVE) can speak for the community; in Igiugig, the village council serves as the AVE. This is just a little of what I’m learning on the job that I thought worthwhile sharing.

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4-1-1 in the 5-3-3 Apr 2014

Written by Alexanna Salmon on .

It took a lot of planning, coordination, and team effort to accomplish all that we did for the IVC this last month. First, I attended a quarterly meeting for Nilavena in Iliamna on March 26. The South Central Foundation President’s Report highlights include: the ANMC labor/delivery expansion has been approved; they are working on behavioral health redesign; SCF opened a clinic in the Valley (Chickaloon); if the tribe has members going out of state there is assistance in finding healthcare. Please don’t hesitate to ask any health coverage questions regarding SCF services and I will try to get the answers.

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4-1-1 in the 5-3-3 Mar 2014

Written by Alexanna Salmon on .

Waqaa Igyararmiut!

The last month has flown by. From February 27 – March 2 I attended the Alaska Library Association annual conference in Anchorage. On the first day I attended a pre-conference with the enthusiastic “Librarian on Loan”, Jennifer LaGarde of North Carolina. I learned how to use new digital tools (like the i-Pad, phone, etc) for educational programs for schools. She provided shocking statistics of “why technology matters”. For example, worldwide, in our poorest communities, we will only get more devices.

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4-1-1 in the 5-3-3 Feb 2014

Written by Alexanna Salmon on .

One of my staple New Year’s resolutions is to become more organized. It was the end of January before I cleared my desk, it had months of paperwork needing new files and the file cabinet needed weeding. The handymen also turned the middle office into a “Records Room” which Sandy and I are thrilled about. One wall is lined with file cabinets and the other with shelves for all of our grant and program binders. Kannon also ordered a large wireless hard drive that we have been digitally archiving all of IVCs files for any future administrations. So, organization is off to a stellar start!

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4-1-1 in the 5-3-3 Sep-Oct 2013

Written by Alexanna Salmon on .

IVC had many visitors as summer segued into fall. The first was an assessor from USDA to conduct a vulnerability analysis and certify our Priority Measures Plan for the Water Treatment Plant. Then, Corey Arnold, a photographer and journalist with Outside Magazine, and his companion Eugenie a blogger for Modern Farmer, visited our greenhouse. The Alaska Department of Transportations’ new Southwest area planner and leasing specialists visited to see first-hand the airport improvements needed in Igiugig. Tim Troll and his team stopped in for three weeks to conduct fish surveys in the area. Nanginaaq Productions completed documentary filming of elder Mary Olympic, during which time I had the opportunity to fly to Kukaklek Lake and listen to stories about my grandmother. For this project, I owe an enormous thank you to Royal Wolf Lodge c/o Chris and Linda Branham, and also Tim Troll for providing modes of transportation for our group. At the same time, we had filmers from Earth Justice visit Igiugig to interview council members on our sustainability efforts and renewable energy projects. Needless to say, if we do not see cameras for a long time that would be good.

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4-1-1 in the 5-3-3 Jul 2013

Written by Alexanna Salmon on .

On June 25-26 we had visitors regarding the Igiugig hydro-power project: Bill Price with Gray Stassel Engineering, Monty Worthington and Doug Johnson with Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC), David Roe and Jim Boschma with Boschma Technologies (BRI), and Shaun and Rorik Peterson with UAF associated with the BRI project.

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4-1-1 in the 5-3-3 Jun 2013

Written by Alexanna Salmon on .

It is hard to write a monthly report when our village has been surrounded in sadness, with the recent loss of Howard Nelson. In our last communication on March 30, Howard wrote: “Igiugig is home. I am elsewhere, Igiugig is people and home.” He was living in Levelock at the time, but his final resting place is Igiugig. On behalf of the Village of Igiugig, we send our greatest condolences to his family during this tragic time.